Accepting Feedback

Wishing Well
Reading Time: 7 minutes

Up to this point we’ve dug pretty deep into the concept of Resilience, mainly focusing on the internal dialogues that are critical to our improvement, time management, and focus; in order to dial in on what it takes to really push forward and succeed, however difficult that may be.

In this article we are going to change it up and focus on one external factor that requires a lot of resilience, Accepting Feedback.

Feedback is critical to improvement because it illuminates the blind spots that hinder our maximum potential. Outside of incredible internal revelations, there aren’t many cures for blind spots other than feedback. When it comes to self-improvement in anything, blind spots are your worst enemy.

Blind Spots

Blind Spot

What are blind spots? Psychological blind spots are described as personality traits or behavior traits that we possess, but are unable to see. Similar to a physical blind spot in our vision. In eSports, I’d refer to it as a performance blind spot.Continue Reading–>

Standing Tall – Resilience revisited

Reading Time: 7 minutes

In our previous look at the concept of mental resilience, we discussed the basics, aimed at helping you set reasonable expectations, and get reasonable results. In this article I’m going to continue that trend, by repeating a cold fact from the last one.

Success isn’t earned, it’s leased. And rent is due, every single day. Take a moment to re-read the first post, keeping in mind that we aren’t born with resiliency, rather it’s created.

Brave New World:

We live in a new era, not just in the realm of Esports, but all walks of modern life.Continue Reading–>

The Day After – Post Tournament Loss

Chess
Reading Time: 6 minutes

We’ve all been there. After hours of playing, grinding, studying we feel ready to go into this next tournament. In fact during warm ups, or the session the night before we can’t be beaten. “This will be the tournament where I get out of pools.” We say to ourselves. But then, after a crushing loss that sends us out of the tournament we are left with a flurry of thoughts and a surging energy. Some of which are hurtful, helpful, and hopeful. This is a devastating moment, but it’s effect’s don’t have to be negative. Let’s take a look at these reactions to better help us identify them in the moment.

Reactions are Relative

Electric

Not everyone shares the same reactions after a loss. In fact each variable could probably be broken down into a separate post all together. So for this example let’s make a few assumptions. Continue Reading–>

The Enemy Within – Introduction to Resilience

Thinking Man Statue
Reading Time: 4 minutes

Over the course of your career in esports, you’ll face a great many opponents, some good, some bad, some great. You’ll make friends, develop rivalries, and if you’re lucky, you’ll find a mentor or two along the way. Players come, and players go, scenes dissolve, but there is one opponent who will never stop coming, never let up. That opponent is you.

We’ve all heard the saying “I’m my own worst enemy”, an expression that holds true in the lab, the court, the locker room, or even the main stage. We all know it, the doubt, the fear, the complacency. That little voice in your head that says “I’ll never be as good as X”, “I’ve practiced enough, I can take a few days off”, or “I’m not good enough”. These kinds of doubts, hesitations, might-be’s, and other negative images will haunt you, seek to drag you down, force you to quit. They will plague you throughout your whole career, but only if you let them.

So how do you avoid these pitfalls, how do you recover from an emotional defeat, or embarrassing upset? How do you bounce back from the worst blows that life can throw at you?

Continue Reading–>